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Archive for the ‘Hostos Community College’ Category

Click here to download the paper.

The Struggle for CUNY: A History Of The CUNY Student Movement, 1969 – 1999

By Christopher Gunderson

Contents

1 Introduction

5 A Brief History Of Cuny

7 Cuny Student Activism Before 1969

9 The Global Context

12 The Open Admissions Strike

22 The Effects Of Open Admissions

24 Struggles In The 70S

30 The New York City “Fiscal Crisis”

38 The Fight For Hostos

42 Tuition Imposed

45 Cuny Student Activism In The 1980S

46 The 1989 Student Strike

52 The 1991 Student Strike

58 After The Strikes

60 The 1995 Struggle

66 Student Government

66 The Attack On Remediation

67 Conclusions

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This 10 point program was put out by Hostos Students for Open Admissions and the Hostos Student Government in Spring 1998. Contact information is at the end of the document.

An Open Admissions Program For a Democratic City University

We demand:

1. Defend and Extend Open Admissions

Open Admissions has guaranteed that every New Yorker with a high school diploma or G.E.D. can attend a college in the City University. A victory of the Civil Rights Movement, Open Admissions meant working people, the poor, people of color, and immigrants whose segregated, inferior public education may have failed to adequately prepare them for college-level work would not be denied the chance for a decent education a second time by being denied access to college.

Since Open Admissions was won in 1970, more than 450,000 students have earned their degrees from CUNY. Since 1970, more people of color have graduated from CUNY than have graduated from any other institution in the history of this country. Open Admissions has been one of the most significant democratic educational achievements in this country since Reconstruction.

2. Stop the Plans to Stratify CUNY by Race and Class

Because the city_s public school system reflects and reinforces racial and class inequalities, any plan to establish a few elite colleges with descending tiers to a non-college immersion basement is inherently racist. Community colleges should not be used as a remedial dumping grounds. Open the senior colleges to students who are prepared for college work, but may need some remedial work. No non-college “institutes.” CUNY must be a public university responsive to the communities it was created to serve. (more…)

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[This list was made in 1998, at a time when many of the original SLAM groups had ceased being active on various campuses. So this is only accurate for the 1998 era of SLAM. For example, SLAM members at Brooklyn College were working with a new campus activist group because the original SLAM was no longer functioning there as a campus group.]

Active Groups

This list of active CUNY student groups is incomplete. The contact information for groups has been removed from this page since basically none of the contact info is good anymore. The page is otherwise left as is for historical purposes.

Brooklyn College Students Speak Out A coalition at BC organizing around open admissions issues. 718-951-5766

CCNY Coalition  The activist coalition at City College.

CCNY SLAM!  CCNY SLAM!

Grad. Center Doctoral Student Council

Hostos Students for Open Admissions

Hostos Student Government

Hunter College SLAM!/USG

Queens College SLAM! and Queensboro College SLAM!

NY Public Interest Research Group (NYPIRG)

Welfare Rights Initiative (WRI)

CUNY Student Network Against Workfare (SNAW)

SLAM! Home Page | What’s New | Current Activities | Active Groups | Articles /Publications | SLAM! Documents | SLAM! Links

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From the New York Times, Tuesday, February 24, 1998:

Protesters Disrupt CUNY Board Meeting Over Remedial Education Proposal

By KAREN W. ARENSON

The trustees of the City University of New York had just been informed of the largest cash gift they had ever received-$10 million from George Weissman, the former chairman of the Philip Morris Companies and of Lincoln Center, and his wife, Mildred-when a slender, young blond man leapt onto the board table yesterday afternoon, disrupting Mr. Weissman’s remarks.

That protester, and another who clambered onto the table earlier in the meeting, were pulled down and arrested by CUNY security officers. Other demonstrators lining the back of the boardroom chanted, “Education is a right,” an angry rejoinder to proposals by Herman Badillo, the vice chairman of the board, and others to restrict enrollment of students who require remedial classes. (more…)

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